Monday, 16 September 2019 17:20

Young Children’s School Day Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity in Interactive Versus Non-interactive Active Video Games

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You Fu 1, , Ryan D. Burns 2*, Emma Gomes 1, Ya-Wen Hsu 1, Zan Gao 3

Abstract

Differences between interactive active video games (AVGs) and non-interactive AVGs on sedentary behavior, light physical activity, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity has never been compared. Therefore, the purpose of this study to compare differences between two AVGs modalities on sedentary behavior, light physical activity, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity implemented within an academic classroom setting in children. Participants were 44 children (20 girls; mean age = 7.68 ± 1.49 years) from two elementary schools. Over 3 weeks, children in the non-interactive AVGs group completed three 10-minute classroom-based AVGs sessions daily (Monday-Friday). Children in the interactive video gaming group spent an identical amount of time daily in classroom-based AVGs. Participants’ school day sedentary behavior and physical activity were assessed across 3 weeks using accelerometers. Linear mixed effects models were employed to compare differences between AVGs modalities across 3 weeks on sedentary behavior and physical activity controlling for the potential confounding of age and sex. Children participating in the interactive video gaming had a 14.4% greater increase in sedentary behavior, a 2.4% greater increase in light physical activity, and a 7.4% greater decrease in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity from Week 1 to Week 3 relative to non-interactive AVGs (p < 0.001). After adjusting for age and sex, across all time-points, children who participated in interactive gaming had lower sedentary behavior (mean difference = -45.8%, p < 0.001), lower light physical activity (mean difference = -5.1%, p = 0.034), and higher moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (mean difference = 24.7%, p < 0.001) compared to children participating in non-interactive AVGs. Although children participating in the 3-week interactive video gaming had lower sedentary behavior, lower light physical activity, and higher moderate-to-vigorous physical activity compared to non-interactive gaming, the magnitude of the differences were not sustained across the intervention.

Keywords: Exergaming; schoolchildren; physical activity; sedentary behavior

Category: Fitness, Health, and Nutrition .

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Read 127 times Last modified on Monday, 23 September 2019 18:07