Get Me to the Meet on Time: Challenges of High School Coaching

Seth E. Jenny, Ph.D.
Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC, USA

Abstract

In order to achieve success, there is little doubt that sport coaches must overcome a plethora of challenges beyond simply designing and implementing effective training schedules and competition strategies. The United States high school interscholastic sports environment is no different. The purpose of this short essay is to provide a personal coaching narrative from a United States high school boys and girls cross country coach as he discusses the challenges confronted in overcoming administrative obstacles to successfully prepare his student-athletes for competition. In particular, this paper chronicles how the coach successfully negotiated the political landscape of having his team being permitted to be dismissed from school in adequate time to arrive at away weekday cross country meets in order to adequately warm-up and prepare for competition. Oftentimes, these coaching stories exist, but are rarely recorded. It is the hope of the author that other coaches in similar situations may glean ideas on how to best handle these situations within their their own programs. This essay may be of interest to all coaches, but high school coaches in particular, as many of whom may be able to relate to the administrative issues that have to be negotiated for a sport program to thrive. Moreover, further commentary and discussion on this topic is invited.

Keywords: interscholastic athletics, cross country, running, pre-performance routines, warm-up

Category: Practitioner's Notes

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A case study: Review of an Indigenous digital resource as a potential medium for dance undergraduate teaching and learning: Cassie’s Story: Dyan Ngal (Wiradjuri for ‘fix me’)

Abstract

The following article comprises a case study that considers the potential for an Indigenous digital resource to be used within a dance undergraduate context. In this manner, suggestions for dance pedagogy and practice are offered in relation to the Indigenous Education Strategy at Charles Sturt University, together with a university digital learning resource, Cassie’s Story: Dyan Ngal, that seeks to develop cultural competence. Through exploration of one scene from this latter resource, the author expands on the ways in which it could become the stimulus and indeed provide a framework for dance composition teaching and learning at undergraduate level. Dance has long been viewed by dance anthropologists as a cultural manifestation and a vehicle through which culture might be understood (Kaeppler, 1981; Kealiinohomoku, 1983). The author has endeavoured to underpin each element of her dance teaching and learning processes with an awareness of culture, whilst outlining creative, thematic and cross-curricular possibilities with Cassie’s Story.

Keywords: Cultural competence, culture, Indigenous, Laban, cross-curricular, tokenism.

Category: Practitioner's Notes

 

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Mission

 

The Journal, Teaching, Research, and Media in Kinesiology (JTRM) is an online peer-reviewed international research and practice journal in the field of Kinesiology. The journal focuses on publishing high standard articles and is indexed in ERIC (Education Resource Information Center) and SIRC (Sport Information Resource Centre). The Journal intends to serve the information needs of a global community of kinesiology scholars, physical educators, coaches, kinesiology majors, athletes, and sport parents. Therefore, the journal’s focus is on facilitating open and easy access to scientific knowledge to support further evidence based practice in all sports, physical education, and physical activity related fields and disciplines. JTRM has also a special interest in joining scientific work on the use of technology in support of physical activity, physical education and sports. The journal also welcomes and encourages contributors to include clarifying visual materials such as video clips, animations, pictures, hyperlinks, ... etc. to their work. The Journal publishes on behalf of Sports Media, a non-profit organization based in Belgium. The readership for this Journal is varied and ranges from academics to practitioners from a range of disciplines and areas of application.

 

Scope

 

The scope of the journal encompasses original research, reviews, case studies, research notes, practitioner’s notes, and commentaries in the fields of all areas of physical education, health and sports. Manuscripts considered for publication are those that add theory based new knowledge through original research or reviews. Both quantitative and qualitative research paradigms are welcome.

 

As a fundamental principle, all materials submitted for publication shall be evaluated for relevance and contribution to the field of kinesiology and for clarity of the narrative via a peer review process that enlists members of the Editorial Board and the designated Expert Reviews. The Editor-in-Chiefs, in consultation with the Editorial Board members and Reviewers, reserves the right to accept, accept with required modifications, or reject a manuscript.

Associations between Adolescents’ Situational Motivation and Objectively-Determined Physical Activity Levels in Physical Education

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to examine the predictive strength of adolescents’ situational motivation to their physical activity physical activity levels in physical education. Method: A total of 259 middle school students ranging from 11 to 14 years old participated in the study. Participants completed the Situational Motivation Scale in one class. Their PA levels were then assessed by pedometers and Actical® accelerometers for three days. Physical activity levels were quantified as steps per minute for pedometers and percentages of time in sedentary behavior as well as light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for accelerometers. Results: Multiple regression analyses yielded adolescents’ intrinsic motivation was the only positive predictor for their time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (ß = .22, p < .05), and a significant negative predictor in sedentary behavior (ß = -.28, p < .01). Additionally, amotivation negatively predicted steps per minute (ß = -.15, p < .05). Conclusion: Physical educators should identify effective strategies to enhance adolescents’ intrinsic motivation.

Keywords: amotivation, external regulation, identified regulation, intrinsic motivation, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity

Category: Secondary P.E.

 

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Integration of Active Video Games in Extracurricular Activity at Schools

Jung Eun Lee 1, Charles Huang, Ph.D. 2 Zachary Pope 1, and Zan Gao, Ph.D. 1

1 School of Kinesiology, the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

2 School of Education, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX

 

Abstract

Active video games require players to be physically active. Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is an interactive dancing game that requires fast-foot movement coordinated with energetic music and visuals. The Wii and Xbox Kinect games have also become good active video games for the promotion of physical activity participation. These games are much more interactive than traditional games because more body movements are added to the video game experiences. Active video games, if applied in extracurricular settings, will be helpful in maximizing the opportunity for children to be active. As such, this article discusses the health benefits of these active video games, and how to integrate these games into after-school physical activity programs. Additionally, the article also provides strategies for the implementation of DDR, Wii and the Xbox to stage the games, establish competitive/non-competitive physical activity atmospheres, promote teamwork, and improve student physical activity levels.

Keywords:

Dance Dance Revolution, physical activity, school children, Wii, Xbox Kinect

Category

Technology in P.E.

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How many P.E. videos are in the video database?

Surf through our 3602 P.E. Videos

Defining Success within a “Successful” Men’s NCAA Division I Sport Program

Dr. Seth E. Jenny - Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC, USA
Dr. Glenn F. Hushman - University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Abstract

A coaching philosophy is a personal doctrine, or individual set of experiences and values, that guides a coach’s beliefs, actions, and coaching style (Huber, 2013). The humanistic coaching philosophy involves a collaborative coach/athlete process which considers individual athlete differences, abilities, and goals, with the long-term aim of developing a self-confident and self-regulated athlete (Lyle, 1999). Opposite of the traditional model where success is determined by wins or losses, within the humanistic approach winning is redefined so that the process is emphasized and achievement of individual athlete goals indicates success. Through coach interviews, athlete interviews, training session observations, and artifact collection, the aim of this case study was to explore the coaching philosophy and methods of a successful men’s NCAA Division I cross country coach and explore to what extent they are humanistic. Definition of success emerged as a primary theme where results indicated that while the participant coach was extrinsically motivated by outcome measures (i.e., winning NCAA national championships), his methods ascribed to the humanistic values of striving for individual athlete potential, holistic development, and self-actualization. Findings suggest that while the NCAA espouses to holistic development of the student-athlete, it is hard to separate athletic outcome measures as at least a portion of the definition of success for coaches working within this setting. .

Keywords:

coaching philosophy, humanism, distance running, cross country

Category

Original Research

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Learning how to do a handstand

Learning how to do a handstand is one of the most important steps to becoming a good gymnast ... It is one of the first moves that gymnasts learn.

Manual for Acrobatics: Handstand, hand to hand, banquine ( 50 p.)

Can Pre-Service Physical Education Majors Identify Learning Standards During Authentic Teaching Episodes?

Mike Kniffin, John Foley, Lynn Couturier MacDonald and Kath Howarth
The State University of New York - Cortland

Abstract

Only a handful of research studies have been conducted to determine whether or not physical educators or pre-service physical education teachers are utilizing learning standards in their teaching. While pre-service teachers are typically required to align lesson objectives and content, their extent of their understanding of how learning standards are implemented in actual teaching is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if undergraduate physical education majors could identify instances and non-instances of physical education teachers incorporating learning standards in their lessons. Pre-service teachers viewed a series of secondary physical education teaching episodes captured on digital video recordings. The inter-agreement (IOA) scores for 101 physical education majors ranged from 65%-82% for the four New York State Learning Standards and from 51%-98% for the six National Association of Sport and Physical Education Standards. The researchers found that participants had the most difficulty identifying New York State Learning Standard 2 and National Association of Sport and Physical Education Learning Standard 5, with IOA scores of 65% and 51% respectively. Both of these standards involve personal and social responsibility and fall within the affective domain.

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